God's News Ticker

We Must Monitor Those Mini Libraries in Front Lawns

Freehold folks ask me often to keep close tabs on which books are available in the Freehold Public Library. I consult with Pastor Zeke often about the proposed new acquisitions. The result is great Christian recreational reading for adults and children in Freehold.

I am concerned, however, at the new trend to build tiny attractive little structures and putting them on front lawns with a sign, “Free Books; Take One Leave One.” We need to know what kind of books are there for unsupervised children and adults.

If you were one of those homosexuals, what better way to convert healthy heterosexual children into your lair than slipping homer literature into these mini libraries. The same for Wiccans, abortionists and liberals.

I’ve asked the Freehold Police Department to go through these “libraries” and report back to me what they find. I’d ask all residents in Freehold to let me know if they intend to put one of these ugly structures on their front lawn so we can visit about appropriate books.

I hope all residents of Freehold are enjoying our beautiful summer weather.

Johny Joe Hold, Mayor

Book It: Bring a Mini Library to Your Front Yard

Take a book, leave a book. An ingenious lending-library idea is sweeping the nation — see if it’s right for your neighborhood



Todd Bol has a background in international business development. More specifically: He used to help developing countries institute social change. He’d always been known to think big and globally. But this man of social generosity couldn’t have expected that, while messing around and building things on his deck one day, a dollhouse-size structure he turned into a free community library would have the global impact it does today.

Bol’s prototype spawned Little Free Library, a nonprofit that seeks to place small, accessible book exchange boxes in neighborhoods around the world. Users can purchase the boxes directly from LFL’s website, download plans to build their own or completely wing it.

The concept is simple: A house-shaped box in a neighborhood holds a few dozen books. Neighbors are invited to share a book, leave a book or both.

The LFL almost always uses recycled materials for the custom libraries it sells online, for an average cost of $250 to $500, but it also offers plans for making your own.

 


Replies:
Nobar King (10-07-2016 02:36 AM): I'm starting to think that the people that have these are really just hoarders afraid 2 throw out or burn a book that's no longer useful. They want you to get rid of it for them. Edit- Have you ever seen ...
Johny Joe Hold (10-07-2016 12:15 PM): I'm starting to think that the people that have these are really just hoarders afraid 2 throw out or burn a book that's no longer useful. They want you to get rid of it for them. Edit- Have you ever seen ...
Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson (10-07-2016 10:41 PM): With the little libraries packed with books, it will be quite a task to pull out each book and inspect for sinful content. Perhaps we could start with just a generic alert. Each mini library could be ...
Just Chris (12-07-2016 03:24 AM): Well for all the evil literature we can unite as a community and have a good old fashioned book burning ...
H. Montague Worthington (13-07-2016 09:05 AM): I am against any public library at any scale. The expectation of a loan, or getting ANYTHING for free, is SOCIALISM. To be honest, I am even against Bibles being loaned or given away for free. Think of ...
Roland (13-07-2016 01:04 PM): Just here in Freehold alone, there are hundreds of people who make all or part of their living from Bible-related commerce. The next time you think of LOANING a Bible to someone, imagine the employees ...
Show all 19 replies.